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There’s nothing like Australia!

International students researching their options for study are faced with numerous – often confusing – options and factors to consider. Is the climate right for me? Do I want to live in a Central Business District or a coastal area? Which territory do I want to study in – Western Australia, Queensland or even the Australian Capital Territory? We’re here to help you answer such questions, and ensure that the process of choosing a path for study is smoother and more intuitive for students, parents and counsellors alike.

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FEATURED INSTITUTIONS

STUDYING IN AUSTRALIA

Pete’s Urban Planning Degrees at the University of New England

Pete Russell is a Manager of International Development for a consultancy based in Canberra, Australia. He graduated from the University of New England (UNE) in...

Why Study Chemistry in Australia?

As the science of matter, chemistry is often what links other fields of science. Being the central science, chemistry plays a key role in...

Arriving in Australia: Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth & Adelaide

Once you have applied to study in Australia and your visa has been approved, there is one vital thing left to do: get there!...

STUDENT LIFESTYLE

Graduation and Saying Goodbye

Hi everyone, I'll give you some numbers! 18 months spent in Australia 26 days before I travel back home +∞ the number of friends I will...

Top 5 Reasons To Live and Study In Perth

Deciding where in Australia you should live and study? Here's 5 reasons why Perth should be at the top of your list. 1. Cost of...

Why Study Chemistry in Australia?

As the science of matter, chemistry is often what links other fields of science. Being the central science, chemistry plays a key role in...

SCHOLARSHIPS

The skinny on scholarships for trade schools

At a time when some job opportunities are shrinking, no career paths present greater opportunities and growth than the skilled trades. Demand for tradesmen...

Time Runs Fast

My first year in Oz: university, adventures, work and new friends! It was the 2nd of January 2012 when I finally arrived in Australia and...

Studying in Australia: What is the Timeline?

Every year, thousands of international students flock to one of Australia’s 39. According to the latest available figures, only the USA and Britain attract more...

WHAT ALUMNI SAY

Pete’s Urban Planning Degrees at the University of New England

Pete Russell is a Manager of International Development for a consultancy based in Canberra, Australia. He graduated from the University of New England (UNE) in...

From India to Australia – Atharva Desai’s Masters at Swinburne University

Atharva Desai was working in a high-level position for an IT firm in India when he decided to go overseas to Australia. To take...

Ayaz Ahmad at Victoria University Melbourne

Ayaz Ahmad completed a Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) (Honours), at Victoria University, 2014-2017. We asked him about the course, student life,...

Why You Should Study Supply Chains

Everything you see around you was delivered through a supply chain.

You can’t live in the world of today without supply chains. They are all around us. But more people need to study them so that they can become more efficient. If supply chains aren’t well managed, you can end up paying more for the goods and services you like – from your clothes to your food. It can also be less environmentally friendly.

Ask yourself these questions:
  • Do you like to eat?
  • Do you like nice clothes?
  • Do you enjoy your tech?
  • Do you care about your health?
  • Do you like to socialize?
  • Do you like saving money?
If you said yes to any of these questions, then you’ll be interested to know that the reason you can enjoy these goods and activities is through the operation of supply chains.

Supply Chains and the Environment

CO2e emissions from transportation account for approximately 16.2% of total global emissions. Most emissions from transportation (approximately 75%) come from road transportation. Given that we’d all like to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, you would assume that everyone in the industry would be focused on improving operations and that transportation emissions would be declining over time based on improved technology. You’d be mistaken. A key part of the problem is that many of the transport vehicles that you see on the highway or in your neighborhood are operating at less than full capacity. This means that there are more vehicles delivering goods than are actually needed, leading to more environmental impacts.

What You Can Study to Help

Fortunately, there’s something you can study that can help. At KLU (Kühne Logistics University) in Germany, our MBA in Leadership and Supply Chain Management focuses on helping business professionals understand the importance of well run, sustainable supply chain operations and how to best manage these operations. It also teaches you how to help them leverage their knowledge and experience to more efficiently lead organizations operating in our globalized world. KLU’s MBA in Leadership and Supply Chain Management helps students understand that reducing the number of delivery vehicles in neighborhoods requires greater efficiencies in loading, more collaboration between shippers and transport companies, and more innovative approaches to last-mile delivery operations. The KLU MBA program also stresses that sustainable change can only come about if we, as consumers, think a little before we push that online order button. However, we act as consumers. What’s needed in the industry are young, smart and innovative individuals interested in making a difference. Developing these individuals is the focus of KLU’s MBA program. Our part-time MBA in Leadership and Supply Chain Management is an exciting educational experience focused on preparing high potential professionals to become global leaders in supply chain operations and management. Students completing this program acquire practical knowledge and skills enabling them to:
  • Take on leadership roles in global businesses with complex international operations;
  • Develop effective corporate and supply strategies to compete in complex international settings;
  • Develop the ability to analyze complex business problems and to effectively apply management practices and principles to these challenges;
  • Understand complexities of intercultural cooperation to ensure effective interaction with international subsidiaries and partners;
  • Leverage the creative energies of themselves and their colleagues to create innovative solutions to global operational issues that are both sustainable and profitable.
Through the MBA program at KLU, you get to learn in an international, multicultural atmosphere: our students and professors come from all over the world, all our courses are held in English, and our curricula address the international issues facing today’s businesses. As part of the MBA program, two sessions are held at international partner universities: one at the Fisher College of Business, at the Ohio State University, USA, and one at Tongji University in Shanghai, China.

An Exciting Opportunity to Study Abroad in Germany

Our MBA helps to boost your career by enhancing your leadership skills, developing your decision-making skills, providing you with knowledge about state-of-the-art approaches to addressing current global trends like sustainability, digitalization, and increasing protectionism and providing you with the business acumen to move up the career ladder, particularly with the emphasis we place on the environment. Join the individuals who have attended KLU’s MBA in Leadership and Supply Chain Management program and change your world for the better. Globalization, your use of the internet for shopping, your desire for rapid home delivery, and problems with supply chain operations mean that transportation, unlike all other sectors of the global economy, is increasing its CO2e emissions. This is quite disappointing, given that we all want to limit global warming. Reductions in CO2e may come as transport companies begin employing electric or hydrogen-powered vehicles, but the social impact of the ever-increasing number of delivery vehicles in your neighborhood will not go away. Supply chains are extremely important, and they need professional managers and strong leadership. If you are truly interested in the environment and a future where you can enjoy the many wonders of this world without being overrun with parcel delivery trucks, or buzz bombed by drones delivering packages, learn about how you can better manage the flow of everything around you. If this sounds like you, then KLU’s MBA in Leadership and Supply Chain Management is the right program for you. Author: Prof. J. Rod Franklin, Ph.D. Full Professor of Logistics Practice & Academic Director of Executive Education Find out more about Kühne Logistics University. Enjoyed this article? Check out our other business and management subject guides.

An Interview with a Sports Therapist

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Jenny Jones is a lecturer in Sports Therapy at the University of Hertfordshire and a sports therapist for the England U18 Men’s basketball team. We spoke to her about her career.

What path did you take to become a sports therapist?

“I studied the 3-year degree at what was then University College Chichester which is now Chichester University. Whilst at Uni I made every effort to gain as much work experience as possible to maximise my chances of employment after graduating. Once I had graduated in 2004 I started working part-time with a semi-professional football club and in two sports injury clinics, one physiotherapy and one chiropractic clinic. “After 6 months working I decided I wanted to gain more experience in sports so decided to spend a month at a University in America. There, I worked in the Athletic Training room which gave me access to athletes from a large variety of sports. I spent quite some time with the Men’s basketball team where my love for the game increased even more. This led to me making the decision that I wanted to work full time in basketball if possible. “On return to the UK, I managed to secure a full-time job with a professional team in the British Basketball League. Unfortunately, the club folded in 2006 so I moved on to begin lecturing at the University of Hertfordshire. Whilst taking a slight detour from full-time practice I was very keen to maintain my hands-on sports therapy; since joining the University of Hertfordshire I have worked with Saracens Rugby, Arsenal Ladies Academies and UK athletics. “Throughout my career so far I have maintained my passion for basketball and for the past 3 years have been the Sports Therapist for the England U18 Men’s team.”

What are the best and worst things about your job?

“There are many best parts about being a sports therapist, I truly love the job. It can be very rewarding when players return to full fitness and can play again. Being part of a very close team experiencing the highs and lows together makes the job really enjoyable. “There are obviously negative aspects to the job as with everything. One of them is that it is extremely time-consuming and hours are not predictable. Working at the crack of dawn and into the night as well as every weekend can be very demanding on your time; not only on you but it also has a knock-on effect on your family at home. This is by far the biggest disadvantage of working in sport. I find the best way to get around this is to work in a sport your family like and can, therefore, come and watch. It keeps them happy too!”

What is the best advice you can give people wanting a career in sports therapy?

“The key to success in this profession is motivation, determination and love of sports. I would recommend getting as much experience in as many sports as possible. Get yourself a first-aid certificate and volunteer at Saturday league games or help out with local sports or physiotherapist. The Society of Sports Therapists website is a key source of information for anyone interested in the profession.”

What would a normal day be like for a sports therapist?

“My current career is slightly different to a full-time sports therapist. I lecture at the University of Hertfordshire but I have recently returned from a European Basketball Championships in Bosnia. I will give you an example of a day there:

Pregame

“On a game day, we would wake early and have breakfast as a team. Following this, we would have a short break before training. I would use this time to treat any injured players or get on with all the pre-training preparation. This involves taping and massaging the players that require it. “Any new injuries that had occurred in the game the previous night would also be assessed in this time. A decision on whether they could train and/or play would be made. The team would then all go to training where I would be available for any players that got injured during this time. If there were any injured players, the training time would often be used to run rehabilitation sessions using the spare courts.

After training

“After training, I would take all the players to the swimming pool to run a cool-down session. Following lunch, the players had a team meeting which I would also attend. The management team would meet immediately before this. My role as a sports therapist was to provide details of any injured players and whether they could play or not. Depending on the time of the game there may be an hour or so break for some rest. If the game was early I would begin pre-match preparation after lunch and then travel to the game. At the game, I would sit on the bench and be prepared to treat any injuries that occurred, which in this tournament was many!

Postgame

“Following the game, my role would be to organise a cool down and then assess any injuries and treat any acute injuries immediately. I also had responsibility for the players’ nutrition and rehydration. After treating the players and having dinner I was then free to relax. Depending on game time could be very late in the day. This is an example of a tournament scenario, every day would be similar but less hectic, just a slightly scaled-down version.”

What are the different types of organizations and workplaces that hire sports therapists?

“When I first graduated in 2004 the employability of a sports therapist was limited and it took a lot of motivation and perseverance to get a job. Fortunately, this is no longer the case. Sports Therapy is becoming widely recognised and there is currently employment in
  • Professional sports clubs
  • Various types of sports injury clinics
  • Working with disabled athletes
  • Organised events such as marathons
  • And much more.
“The degree also allows people to go on to further study, a number of students go on to become teachers or study Masters programmes.”

What made you want to become a sports therapist?

“I have always had a real love of all sports and have participated in athletics and basketball from a young age. It was whilst competing for the south of England in athletics that I damaged my knee which resulted in two years of various treatment to no avail and led to a doctor telling me I could no longer participate in athletics. “It was heartbreaking. Being very persistent, I did not like being told I couldn’t do something so I decided I would get educated so that I could fix myself and not let others go through the same experience I had. It was then that I found out about the Sports Therapy degree and it sounded perfect. Two years later I started at Chichester.”

What action can university students take to establish themselves as an attractive candidate to future employers?

“Since taking on the lecturing job at the University of Hertfordshire I have made it a priority to help make our students highly employable. We run events on CV writing and cover letters as well as implementing clinical experience into the degree and providing the option of a sandwich year placement. In my opinion, there are many things students can do whilst studying, but the key is gaining as much experience as possible. This will often mean volunteering at local sports clubs or events, generally getting out and experiencing the working world. It is also important for students to have the academic skills to communicate effectively.” Enjoyed this article? Read these next:

Why Study Politics in the UK?

The UK has one of the longest and richest political histories on the planet, and so it is easy to see why there has always been a strong amount of students studying Politics degrees there. With Brexit and its many complexities, British Politics remains in the public eye. Politics is drastically rising in popularity and awareness amongst young people. This is largely due to social media and the ability to share information. Young people are becoming more informed about social injustice, and so turn to politics to help change the world they live in. Voter turnout is higher than it has even been before within the younger demographics, with the UK leading the way.

What are the best UK Universities to study Politics?

This is the list of the top ten Universities for Politics, according to the Guardian University Guide 2021.
  1. University of St Andrews, Scotland
  2. University of Oxford, England
  3. University of Cambridge, England
  4. London School of Economics, England
  5. King’s College London, England
  6. University of Warwick, England
  7. University of Bath, England
  8. Durham University, England
  9. Canterbury Christ Church University, England
  10. Aberystwyth University, Wales

What qualifications do I need to study Politics in the UK?

  • Typical International Baccalaureate requirements: 34 points
  • Typical A-Level requirements: ABB
  • Typical IELTS requirements: 6.5 overall
We had an interview with Aaron Duncan, a recent Politics and International Student, about why you should study Politics in the UK.

Tell us a little about yourself

“My name is Aaron Duncan, and I have just graduated my Politics and International Relations joint honours at the University of Sussex. I have recently undertaken full-time employment as a Senior Operations Resourcer at a tech company in London, in addition to working with a UK political party.”

Aaron Duncan, Politics and International Relations graduate, University of Sussex

Why did you choose to study Politics?

“I picked Politics as I want to leave my mark on the world. Politics shapes everything from health and science, to business and trade, to civil rights, and power relations. I wanted to gain perspectives from others, as well as enrich my own understanding of how and why the world works as it does. As a young adult, the decisions made by the government of today will affect my life tomorrow. There is nothing I find more exciting than to play my part in the momentous changes to come; both domestically as well as internationally.”

Why would you recommend studying Politics in the UK?

“British politics is the most interesting to study regardless of your background, age, or gender. Studying politics in the UK offers incentives that are simply not available in other countries. It’s rich political history provided by controversial leaders (such as Thatcher, Churchill, Blair, and even May) not only gives one the chance to appreciate the changes the UK has endowed onto the world but how it has also provided global political and social norms in doing so. The UK sets the precedent in terms of how the world now views socio-democratic values. For example, Brexit was a decision never seen in political history. This offers those studying Politics in the UK, such as myself, perhaps the most unique opportunity to analyse, debate, and forecast such an event first-hand.”

What experience do you have with Political work experience in the UK?

“The majority of my political work experience comes from working with UK political parties and local councils. Experience within UK Politics is as accessible as you make it. However, planning your career paths within this area is possibly the most important aspect. In other words, think of your end goal and work backwards- and start volunteering! That’s the key to getting your foot in the door of the field.” Careers in Politics range from the local, national, and international government. As well as a wide range of other professions as well as teaching, media, advising, finance, and banking. If you’re interested in studying politics in the UK and would like to know more, visit Study International UK for a free consultation. Enjoyed this article? Check out our other Arts and Humanities subject guides.

5 Books All Aspiring Medical Students Should Read

Medical students are the unsung heroes of many healthcare industries around the world. They are fresh eyes and new ideas in an ever-challenging world of medicine. Whether in developing countries or developed, the experiences of these inspirational individuals make for some incredible reading. You may laugh, cry or some combination of the two. But if you want to become a medical professional, here are five top picks to keep you entertained on the journey.

Your Life In My Hands – Rachel Clarke

Formerly a television journalist, Briton Rachel Clarke decided to switch careers aged 29. For many doctors, medicine has been their only career. But for Clarke, she had thought that the experiences she had on the ground as a journalist would make another role pale in comparison. Hours “under fire in Congo’s killing fields”? They’d make medicine seem a walk in the park, right? Wrong. From the start of her engaging and charming book she makes it clear that the real challenges she has faced began in the wards of her training hospital. Written with inimitable candidness, her honesty jumps off the page. You can’t help but like the narrator, and get drawn in to the story of her journey. From conversations with Prime Ministers about ‘water closets’ to letters to the national press decrying the state of affairs in the NHS that prompted national protests, the links between her current and past careers is undeniable. Perhaps because of this her voice is strong, her passion infectious and her perspective refreshing. A must-read memoir for those wanting to switch up the monotony of the day job for the challenge of a lifetime: working in medicine.

The Real Doctor Will See You Now – Matt McCarthy

Skipping across the pond, Matt McCarthy‘s first year of med school is underlined with humour from the outset. His first line: “It started with a banana peel.” shows his bemusement at some of the experiences he had when starting out at Columbia University Medical Centre, New York. He details his supportive relationships with his second-year adviser Baio, the trials and tribulations of night shifts and the fear associated with being ‘on call’. More importantly, though, he talks about what he has learned. Not from his university studies or even his supervisors…from the patients he cares for. Of course, like all of the books recommended here, there is a disclaimer at the start. It’s along the lines that whilst the stories are based upon clinical experience, in order to maintain the integrity of the Hippocratic oath sworn by doctors around the world, details have been changed to anonymise patients’ information. However, there is a reality to the words McCarthy writes, and a tenderness without saccharine sweetness in the manner in which he reveres his charges. In particular, the relationship with Benny who had taken up residence in the hospital waiting for a heart transplant is a pull on the heart-strings. Definitely worth a read, and good for raising aspirations too – with his humble beginnings Matt is now an associate professor in medicine as well as serving on the Ethics Committee at a top NY hospital.

When Breath Becomes Air – Paul Kalanithi

The topic of this tome – death – is one that makes many uncomfortable. It is, however, a daily colleague of medical staff. As someone with a conflicted relationship with medicine – a tone of disappointment in an absent father who was brilliant as a physician and lacking in consistency as a parent runs throughout this book – Kalanithi introduces himself as someone who wanted to be a writer rather than a doctor from an early age. This would clearly have been a great career path, evidenced by his careful craftsmanship as his challenging yet compassionate tale unfolds. Paul, it turns out, has passed away and this book is his last foray into the world: an examination of his experiences from both sides of the table as a neurosurgeon and a cancer patient. In his own words, “Life isn’t about avoiding suffering.” By turns delighting and devastating, this tale speaks of humanity and the search for knowledge and joy regardless of an insurmountable illness. Harsh but true, doctors must grow used to death. What better way to learn than through the words of one who’s experienced both?

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor – Adam Kay

Adam Kay is no longer a doctor. After many expensive years of training, and eye-watering experiences to last a lifetime, he hung up his stethoscope in 2010. What remains of his medical career are an assortment of tidbits and anecdotes hastily scribbled down during his time as a Junior Doctor working for the NHS. A rallying cry for his comrades who were still under the cosh from political attacks, Kay sees himself as a counterbalance to the negativity published about the health service. From the absurd to the sublime, this book beggars belief and will leave you with no questions where the phrase, “It takes all sorts to make the world go round.” comes from. Witty footnotes and translations of jargon mean that Kay’s book is informative as well as compelling. Contrasts of days filled with filing and night shifts that would make your hair curl (or straight-up fall out) are intertwined. His conclusion? A very heavily worded letter to the Secretary of State for Health that, if you’ve made it thus far, you’ll be vehemently agreeing with and echoing with your own shortly after. See him read from his book here.

Life as a Medical Student: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly: A dose of reality from 30 medical students – Sihame Benmira

Catchy title, but it does exactly what it says on the tin. This book is aimed at the multitude of young people who know they want to become medical doctors but have little understanding of what the training entails. The provenance of many medical tomes is clear through the authors’ prominence – and yet, who better to hear from than those who have walked the path before you? Benmira successfully tracks the changing emotions and experiences of those pursuing long years of study to achieve that coveted title: Doctor ____. The chapters are organised for first to fifth years, and one for those who are intercalating in a specified area. Sleepless nights and high workloads are common themes, but this is a gem for people requiring a dose of reality…or reassurance that it’s not just you going through it!

Why the UK is the Destination for Studying Project Management

Thinking about becoming a project manager? Then consider the UK as an ideal place to study and start your career. The project profession in the UK is rapidly growing and much in demand – over 2 million people are employed full-time in the project-based roles, contributing £156.5bn to the UK economy – more than marketing or financial services. It’s also a great place to gain a high quality, widely recognised qualification in project management – there are several options for you to approach your studies and you could come away with prestigious letters after your name. There now 46 UK undergraduate and master’s degrees in project management from 34 different universities – all accredited by the Association for Project Management (APM). In short, becoming a qualified project professional can give you many directions in which you can take your career. Here are some of the best reasons to study project management in the UK: You can become chartered APM awards Chartered status to experienced project managers who meet the criteria. Becoming a chartered professional means you are recognised as someone who has gained a specific level of skill or competence in your field of work. Universities, such as Nottingham Trent University, are now offering accelerated routes to chartered status through their Master’s degree courses in project management, so by studying the right course, you could fast track your way to becoming a Chartered Project Professional (ChPP). In addition to giving you international recognition and giving your CV a boost, chartered status means that you have set a framework for developing your career, so that you can grow your skillset and land your ideal role. Big companies recognise PM qualifications Organisations such as Direct Line and Lloyds Bank work with APM to ensure their project managers have the skills they need. They look for qualified professionals with recognised certifications, such as those from APM. They also spend a lot of time helping their project professionals develop and grow. Luca Lowe, a qualified project manager working for Direct Line, said: “The variety of projects and opportunities that you could get at Direct Line Group [appealed to me] and the fact that it was a very business-focused role. The corporate environment also added to the attractiveness of the role.” The pay is good The average salary of a project professional in the UK is £47,500, according to the latest Salary and Market Trends Survey 2019 by APM. Joining APM and becoming a member (MAPM) can also help your earning potential, as it shows you have trusted skills and qualifications. It gives you a better chance of landing larger – and better paid – projects. Job satisfaction is high According to that same survey, eight out of 10 project professionals are satisfied with the work they do, and seven out of 10 were expecting a pay increase in the coming year. The majority (77 per cent) also believe there is a good supply of job roles within the sector. “It’s a role where your improvement and development never ends,” says Sohail Khan, a project manager for Lloyds Banking Group. “Every day is a new challenge, and every week there’s something else that you’ve learned that you can apply to different projects. I like how much it can keep you on your toes. There’s never a dull day.” You’ll be part of a community Joining APM as a student member gives you access to networks of professionals, as well as key content relating to the project profession – methodologies, trends and best practice. It’s also free to join as a student member. Click here to join APM for free now

Why Study At A College

The word ‘college’ means different things in parts of the world. In the USA, it’s often used as another term for university. In the UK however, it means institutions that offer further education courses, higher education courses and trade qualifications. In short, UK colleges, or ‘FE colleges’ offer lots of different courses to lots of different people. There’s something for everyone at college. So, what makes a college a great place to study at? I currently work for the Association of Colleges (AoC), and we represent publicly-funded (i.e. government/state-funded) colleges. From my own experience both studying and working at colleges I can safely say that international students can expect to be part of a welcoming, diverse community when they come to college. Here are some of the reasons why:

The Study Experience

More often than not, you’ll join a class with local students, so you’ll get to meet students living in the local area. If you’re taking an English language course, this will include students from different countries whose first language is not English.  Classes tend to be for 20-30 students at college, with groups of only 15 or 16 students in some workshop and kitchen-based subjects. You can expect a good level of contact with your tutors and to be in class for an average of around 15 hours per week, with additional time you’ll spend studying independently. You’ll be usually taught by lecturers who have worked in the industry you’re learning about. They will have links to employers and will often organise industry visits for your class. Some courses may have the option for a short work placement.  If you choose a traditional academic course at college, such as A Levels, you’ll be taking a recognised qualification for university entry. You will be supported to decide which degree programme and which university are right for you. When you come to college, should you feel unwell or encounter any personal problems, support and advice is available from colleges staff. 

The Living Experience

Colleges are located in big cities, small towns and rural areas, all across England and the rest of the UK. There’s the right location for everyone depending on the kind of experience that you would prefer. Colleges have cafeterias and coffee bars on site, WiFi, quiet areas to study and a library.  It’s affordable to study at college, with the annual course fees costing on average £7,000. You’ll need money for your accommodation too, and whilst some colleges do have student residences onsite, others offer the chance for their students to live with a local family whilst studying. ‘Homestay’ is a really great way to see what British life is like and to improve your English (if it isn’t your first language). 

Amazon Rainforest Fires: How YOU Can Help

The Amazon rainforest has been on fire for the past month, and Brazil has declared a state of emergency in the region. The fires are destroying the homes of indigenous tribes and threatening millions of animal species. The fires are so big now that the smoke can be seen from space. Since January more than 70,000 fires have been detected in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest, up 84% from the number tracked in 2018, according to the country’s National Institute for Space Research. This not only threatens the region’s future, but could also speed up climate change, since the rainforest significantly helps reduce the world’s carbon dioxide levels.
The situation could get even worse, according to the World Resources Institute, since 62% of Brazil’s forest fires traditionally occur in September through the end of the year. The record number of fires is garnering international attention, with French President Emmanuel Macron organizing a $22 million fund at the recent G-7 summit. Celebrities are also weighing in. Madonna took to Instagram to urge Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, to change his policies and actor Leonardo DiCaprio pledged $5 million to help, while rapper Lil Nas X and and supermodel Cara Delevingne have raised awareness via social media.

But what can I do to help?

Deforestation is one of the biggest drivers of these fires. We recommend you eat less meat (since the farmers have to clear some of the forest so the animals have grazing land), use less paper (recycle!), and do what you can to cut your emissions so that we can try to balance out the damage to the planet that these fires have caused. You probably don’t have $5m to spare like Mr DiCaprio, but that doesn’t mean that your donation isn’t invaluable and necessary. There are a few organisations that you can donate to:

Rainforest Alliance

They announced earlier this month that it would be redirecting 100% of its donations to frontline organizations in Brazil working to “protect the Amazon and defend the rights of its Indigenous people”.
 
View this post on Instagram
 

🚨Amazon S.O.S.🚨THANK YOU to everyone who donated in response to our post yesterday—and to all who have helped raise awareness by sharing our post. We have committed to redirect 100% of donations made in August via link in bio to these frontline groups working to defend the Brazilian Amazon: @coiabamazonia (Brazil chapter of our partner COICA, the federation of Amazon Indigenous leaders), @imaflorabrasil (our longtime sustainable agriculture partner), and @socioambiental @ipam_amazonia @imazonoficial @saudeealegria (Brazilian orgs working to defend the Amazon & Indigenous rights). 🔥The fires in the Brazilian Amazon have called worldwide attention to the ongoing crisis of tropical deforestation. Although we are devastated by recent surge of fires in the Amazon, we are also heartened by the overwhelming global response to this crisis—signaling growing awareness that 1) tropical forests are a powerful “natural climate solution” we all depend on, and 2) deep concern for the rights of Indigenous people. 📷 This photo from the Brazil-Peru border in the Amazon was taken by @mohsinkazmitakespictures in 2015. We post this older image to remind our followers that tropical deforestation is an ongoing global emergency that began in the colonial era and rages on today throughout the Amazon, Indonesia, Central America, and other regions where the Rainforest Alliance works. [In the interest of transparency: our work in the Amazon is concentrated in Peru (in the Brazil border region) and Colombia; our work in Brazil focuses on sustainable agriculture in other landscapes.] 🌳Through decades of partnership with Indigenous, forest, and farming communities throughout the tropics, we’ve learned (and scientists have confirmed) that the best defense against deforestation and forest fires = thriving, community-centered rural economies that allow people to make a decent living through sustainable activities. This approach requires deep collaboration and sustained investment over the long term—and it reaps big rewards, as seen in our previous posts about Guatemala. Let’s keep the momentum going! ✊🏽✊🏿✊🏼✊ #prayforamazonia #savetheamazon #rainforestalliance #climatejustice #climateaction

A post shared by Rainforest Alliance (@rainforestalliance) on

Earth Alliance

On Sunday, the organization formed an Amazon Forest Fund. The fund will be focusing resources toward local communities and groups working to protect the Amazon, as well as those affected by the fires. Earth Alliance noted five groups so far that will receive funding, including the Kayapo people, the Brazil chapter of Coordinator of the Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin and the Instituto Socioambiental.

Amazon Watch

An organisation that works with the aboriginal people is Amazon Watch. The group has supported the community’s efforts to stop the proposed dam, and this year, helped convene an assembly of Munduruku youth with Munduruku chiefs.

World Wildlife Fund for Nature

The well-known conservation organization is urging people to not only pay attention, but also shop smart and reduce your fossil fuel consumption. WWF is also encouraging people to speak up, creating an online petition you can sign to call on the governments of Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, Guyana, and Suriname to “protect the Amazon, combat deforestation and reduce the causes of fires.”

Support businesses that support the rainforest

In addition to donating to specific organisations, experts are urging consumers to put their money to work by supporting business and companies working toward sustainable goals. Rainforest Alliance has a list of over 700 companies that the organisation certifies as meeting rigorous environmental and social standards.

What Charities Does eduKUDU Work With?

5th September is International Charity Day! In spirit of this, we thought we would share with you the four amazing charities that we work with.

Make sure you visit our other post about things you can do to get involved with International Charity Day here!

KOTO, a not-for-profit social enterprise, transforms the lives of 200 disadvantaged and at-risk youth in Vietnam each year through our 24-month holistic hospitality training program. KOTO stands for ‘Know One, Teach One’, and reflects their belief that if you’re in a position where you can help someone less fortunate, then you should help them; and the greatest thanks you can receive is to one day see that person be in a position to do the same for someone else. Founded by Jimmy Pham, an Australian-Vietnamese man whose desire was to provide 9 street children with training, a stable income and a safe workplace in a small unassuming sandwich café in Hanoi, has evolved and grown over the last twenty years. After two decades, KOTO continues to be recognised as a dynamic organization producing well-trained graduates who are highly sought after by the tourism and hospitality industry, both within Vietnam and abroad. Almost 1,000 strong alumni network work across the world in leading resorts, hotels, and restaurants. Many have also started their own hospitality and tourism businesses and are employing KOTO graduates themselves. A number of their graduates have received scholarships to further their studies in Australia, thanks to the accreditation of their qualification by Australia’s Box Hill Institute. Visit KOTO’s whySTUDYhere page.
Lights for Learning is a UK charity based in Cricklade, Wiltshire. They build and install solar-powered lighting in places of education. They work mainly in areas of the world where artificial lighting is impossible or hard to obtain. This benefits positively the entire communities in which these schools or clinics are based. They also provide solutions, with training to fit them, to other charities who have their own projects that are also aimed to help lift the education & health standards of similar communities.
In 2009, a ragtag group of travellers headed up Yala peak in Nepal. Seeing the faces of smiling yet poverty-stricken children was a bittersweet experience. These kids have no material goods and limited opportunities, yet still embrace the joy of life. Kathmandu Kids’ intrepid explorers felt a strong need to give something back. Back home in Perth, they joined forces with Sunrise Children’s Association Incorporated (SCAI). The result was Kathmandu Kids and a series of successful fundraising events. Every cent raised has gone towards improving the lives of children in Nepal. In recent years, the programme has expanded out to also provide education for children in the Jhapa and Nuwakot areas as well.
COCO provides sustainable sources of quality education to children living in poor and marginalised communities in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. They believe that education gives children the best possible opportunity to break the cycle of poverty. COCO was founded in 2000 by Steve Cram CBE after he witnessed first-hand the barriers to education for children living in poverty and since then COCO has raised over £4 million to fund sustainable, community-led initiatives, positively impacting on the lives of over 200,000 people. They are currently partnering with 15 remote schools, providing quality education from nursery through to college level.